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ENNEMOND ALEXANDRE PETITOT (Lyon 1727 - Parma 1801)

Ennemond Alexandre Petitot (Lyon 1727 - Parma 1801) was an architect, a drawer, a decorator and an etcher.

He had been one of the antiquisants of the French Academy in Rome, whose leader was Piranesi and later one of the swarm of collaborators and protégés of Count of Caylus. Thanks to the latter, he was called at the francophil court of Philip of Bourbon in the Duchy of Parma, Piacenza and Guastalla, where he would stay until his death as first architect, imposing his architectural and decorative taste.

Petitot, who was deeply influenced by Soufflot and Gabriel's classicism and felt kinship with Condillac's sensationalism, introduced to Italy a new polished style, halfway between rocaille and neoclassicism.

Parma owes him its transformation into a model capital city of enlightened absolutism, during the twenty years ruled by the reformer minister Guillaume Dutillot.

Among his projects: the start of the Accademia di Belle Arti (1757), the restoration of Piazza Grande and Palazzo del Governatore, the new façade of Saint Peter's Church (1760), the Stradone (1763-64), one of the first examples in Italy of French-style promenade publique with a central avenue for coaches and side paths lined by four rows of horse-chestnuts for pedestrians.

The perspective lines of the Stradone are closed by the elegant Casino del Caffé, still called by Parmesans after the name of its architect.



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E.A. PETITOT